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Greg Webb
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Recall of Jardine Cribs Expanded after Reports of Crib Slats Breaking

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A crib recall issued last June has been expanded to include another 56,450 cribs manufactured by Jardine Enterprises. The original recall affected 320,000 wooden Jardine cribs after 42 reports of slats and spindles breaking, including four children who had become entrapped in the space created by those breaks. The expanded recall comes after almost 20 additional reports of crib slats breaking. Nine of those incidents occurred when an infant or toddler broke the slats while in the crib and in one incident a 22-month-old fell though the gap. No injuries were reported by these incidents.

The original recall’s 28 models of cribs were sold from January 2002 to May 2008, and the expanded recall’s additional three models were sold from March 2004 to January 2009. All models were available at retailers nationwide, including Toys “R” Us, Babies “R” Us, KidsWorld and Geoffrey Stores.

After the original recall, the Consumer Product Safety Commission allowed other models of Jardine cribs to remain in the marketplace because they had not received any complaints about them, said an agency spokesman Tuesday.

Retailer Toys “R” Us identified a separate problem after the June recall: smaller slats like those used in Jardine cribs tend to break more easily. The store decided to implement its own, tougher standards, but those standards only applied to newly made cribs.

Consumers can find out more information at Jardine’s website or the CPSC website.

One has to wonder why it has taken as long as it has to recall all of these cribs, especially the ones included in this last, "expanded", recall. One of my law partners litigated one of these types of crib cases recently, where an infant died as a result of this defect. This defect is something that is easily remedied and should never happen.